Category Archives: Climate Change

Resource pack on energy efficiency and community Green Deal

Thanks for your interest in the development of the new Centre for Sustainable Energy resource ‘PlanLoCaL: energy efficiency and community Green Deal’. We are delighted to announce that it is now available on our new PlanLoCaL website to coincide with the national launch of the Green Deal!

The new resources are here. And there’s also a short video of our chief exec Simon Roberts, OBE, explaining the PlanLoCaL resource here. For the full story take a look at the CSE website.

PlanLoCaL is a suite of resources and films to help communities plan for Low Carbon Living. This new pack includes information sheets, case studies, templates and tools. It provides lots of guidance on some tricky and complicated issues so that you don’t have to start from scratch. The aim is to help community groups to make the most out of the Green Deal and gain a better understanding of how to set up and run successful community-led energy efficiency projects in their local area.

Development of the resource was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and draws on the collective knowledge and experience of staff at the Centre for Sustainable Energy. We’ve tried to address all of the questions and comments that have been fed in by community groups across the country to make the resource as useful as possible. We’ll also be producing a printed version of the resource in the near future. Let us know if you’d like to receive a copy.

We hope that you will find it a really comprehensive guide but we’d love to hear your feedback so we can keep improving. If you do have any comments, drop us a line: planlocalgreendeal@cse.org.uk.

Best wishes
CSE Communities
Centre for Sustainable Energy

0117 9341400 (switchboard)
0800 082 2234 (Home Energy Team)
www.planlocal.org.uk
www.cse.org.uk

Climate Week and Transition Towns

Hi

I hope this finds you well. I believe someone from your Transition Town was in touch with my predecessor, Natalie, last year about Climate Week.

Just to remind you, Climate Week is the UK’s largest campaign on climate change and the country’s biggest environmental occasion. It is a positive, celebratory campaign which aims to show how people can live and work more sustainably. Half a million people attend over 3,000 events and it is backed by figures such as the Prime Minister, Sir Paul McCartney and Kofi Annan as well as by over 200 national organisations from business, the voluntary sector, government, science and professional bodies. This year Climate Week is taking place on 4-10th March 2013.

I wanted to contact you to encourage you to enter the Climate Week Awards. As transition towns are at the forefront of protecting our environment and movement on many of the issues important to climate change I would love to know more about what is going on in your local community.

I am currently looking for entries for the Best Campaign category (there are a range of categories if you think your model fits best in another). We are looking for any interesting campaign, large or small, which promoted better environmental practices in 2012.

The winner for last year, the Close the Door Campaign, was very pleased with the support and extra publicity winning the award last year brought them. I hope to do the same for another group of motivated activists.

Please either consider entering or letting me know about another campaign or activity that would be worthy.

All we ask for entries is less than 700 words before the 25th of January. Please find more information on our website here: http://www.climateweek.com/awards/ I would be more than happy to answer any questions.

Either way please get in touch with me so we can link up, support each other when possible, and grow this national movement!

Best,

Casey

Casey Calista, Campaign Coordinator, Climate Week @Climate_Week CW on Facebook

E: casey.calista@climateweek.com
T: 020 3397 2611

2 Elizabeth Street, London, SW1W 9RB

www.climateweek.com

Loss of Arctic Sea Ice … and of a ‘Giant Parasol’

Milborne Wind Farm Proposal

Earlier this week I visited an Exhibition presented by West Coast Energy in the village of Tolpuddle famous for its workers 19th century revolt and where another revolution is being planned.

This time the revolution is creating renewable energy from a Wind Farm.

Its an exciting opportunity for Dorset and its people to really get involved in renewables and begin to take its fair share of the UK’s national energy targets.

West Coast are not a huge conglomerate but have a lot of experience in local wind farm start ups and have so far created 800 megawatts of renewable energy with projects in Scotland,Wales and the Midlands.

Some of their team were at the Village Hall to answer questions and take on board any suggestions or idea’s from the local community.

I really liked their approach and their emphasis on working with the local community,discussing problems at first hand and generally listening to genuine concerns.

What also struck me was their emphasis on Community,something that I believe is so important with renewable energy projects.They aim to give 10% of total revenues to the local community to fund whatever they decide is wanted.This over the 25 year life of the project will amount to circa £7 million pounds.

Local people,groups,Councils will be consulted and the projects fund will be controlled locally. This is hugely important and something that everyone in or near the location should become an integral part of.

Creating clean,sustainable energy with a win for well planned local projects to enhance the area is in itself an amazing opportunity.

The plan itself is to position 10 wind turbines of various sizes in fields North of Tolpuddle itself. The topography is excellent and runs almost parallel with the A35 trunk road from Poole to Dorchester.I never realised just how busy the road is and the car noise will more than drown out any noise created by the turbines. The lack of buildings within the vicinity make it excellent siting and we know for sure that in 25 years time after reaping the winds harvest the fields will be in much the same condition as they are today. No doubt in due course the Farmer will expand on what he intends to continue to do agriculturally near the turbines.

Of course from area’s across the County you will be able to see the turbines and my hope is that overtime they will become iconic symbols of a new way to fuel the development of future generations.

The site itself comes under the control of West Dorset and a special Parish Meeting is planned for the people of Milborne St Andrew in the Autumn where they will present the project and answer questions etc

Communication is vital as is respect for the concerns of everyone. Crucial to this is having the right information so can I suggest that anyone who wants to know more about wind turbines or any related renewable subject goes to www.dorsetenergized.co.uk where they will find real advice,information plus ways to get involved personally with renewable energy.

For local info and support email stur.transitiontown1@gmail.com

Milborne Wind Farm Proposal

Earlier this week I visited an Exhibition presented by West Coast Energy in the village of Tolpuddle famous for its workers 19th century revolt and where another revolution is being planned.

This time the revolution is creating renewable energy from a Wind Farm.

Its an exciting opportunity for Dorset and its people to really get involved in renewables and begin to take its fair share of the UK’s national energy targets.

West Coast are not a huge conglomerate but have a lot of experience in local wind farm start ups and have so far created 800 megawatts of renewable energy with projects in Scotland,Wales and the Midlands.

Some of their team were at the Village Hall to answer questions and take on board any suggestions or idea’s from the local community.

I really liked their approach and their emphasis on working with the local community,discussing problems at first hand and generally listening to genuine concerns.

What also struck me was their emphasis on Community,something that I believe is so important with renewable energy projects.They aim to give 10% of total revenues to the local community to fund whatever they decide is wanted.This over the 25 year life of the project will amount to circa £7 million pounds.

Local people,groups,Councils will be consulted and the projects fund will be controlled locally. This is hugely important and something that everyone in or near the location should become an integral part of.

Creating clean,sustainable energy with a win for well planned local projects to enhance the area is in itself an amazing opportunity.

The plan itself is to position 10 wind turbines of various sizes in fields North of Tolpuddle itself. The topography is excellent and runs almost parallel with the A35 trunk road from Poole to Dorchester.I never realised just how busy the road is and the car noise will more than drown out any noise created by the turbines. The lack of buildings within the vicinity make it excellent siting and we know for sure that in 25 years time after reaping the winds harvest the fields will be in much the same condition as they are today. No doubt in due course the Farmer will expand on what he intends to continue to do agriculturally near the turbines.

Of course from area’s across the County you will be able to see the turbines and my hope is that overtime they will become iconic symbols of a new way to fuel the development of future generations.

The site itself comes under the control of West Dorset and a special Parish Meeting is planned for the people of Milborne St Andrew in the Autumn where they will present the project and answer questions etc

Communication is vital as is respect for the concerns of everyone. Crucial to this is having the right information so can I suggest that anyone who wants to know more about wind turbines or any related renewable subject goes to www.dorsetenergized.co.uk where they will find real advice,information plus ways to get involved personally with renewable energy.

For local info and support email stur.transitiontown1@gmail.com

For the good of all the Community

Hallo,

I hope that you are all coping with our English Summer, I know I have been colder some days and nights lately than in Winter, oh and the rain and we still don’t have enough water to go around.

I entered the scary world of North Dorset Planning Committee and it was a real eye opener.

How we are going to marry the needs of the many to those of well meaning small groups ? I just do not know ! Whilst respecting everyone’s right to have their say, at some stage there has to be a notion “For the good of all the Community”

North Dorset’s approach to Sustainability and our targets for renewable energy leave us languishing far behind other Counties in Britiain who are doing more than their fair share.

Its time we in Dorset stood up and opened our eyes to the responsibility we all share and the need for greater emphasis on renewable energy.

To do this we need groups, communities to work with planners, project installers, funders so that together they can create their own local sustainable projects that all add towards the collective good of our Countries commitments.

The time is now, get involved take a look at Dorset Energized, support your local Stur Valley Energy Group but above all do something.

Please pass this message onto anyone you know, light up our County and make us top of the UK league not bottom.

On another point if anyone knows of a chill display unit that they don’t want or use Gold Hill Organics would love to hear from them. They have a project to turn more of their wonderful Veggies and sales into ready to use servings.

You can get their contact number and address by going to our Food Map,they would be really pleased to hear from you,

Best Wishes, Vince

Masters Quarry Wind Turbine Application

Please find below some paragraphs addressing the Councillor’s concerns, perhaps it will be of use. Happy to send on more, maybe for the Dorset Energise website, if that is of interest?

Kind regards

Marlies
http://www.infinergy.co.uk/ 

Migrating birds

The wind industry is a relatively young industry that has learned enormous amounts in the last 2 decades where development can and cannot take place. The industry has learned from early mistakes and largely improved its development practice; best practice guidelines now incorporate guidance on how to protect wildlife, for example having ecological designated areas where development cannot take place and the mapping of migration routes to stay well away from. Close cooperation with consultees such as Natural England, the RSPB and Scottish Natural Heritage ensures responsible development.

Ruth Davis head of Climate Change Policy at the RSPB, said: “The need for renewable energy could not be more urgent. Left unchecked, climate change threatens many species with extinction. Yet, that sense of urgency is not translating into action on the ground to harness the abundant wind energy around us.

“The solutions are largely common sense. We need a clear lead from government on where wind farms should be built and clear guidance for local councils on how to deal with applications. We must reduce the many needless delays that beset wind farm developments.

“This report shows that if we get it right, the UK can produce huge amounts of clean energy without time-consuming conflicts and harm to our wildlife. Get it wrong and people may reject wind power. That would be disastrous.”

David Baldock, Director of the IEEP, said: “The development of renewable energy in Britain has to accelerate greatly if new binding targets are to be met. This means that the planning system must facilitate a step change in the construction of wind power. The best experience elsewhere shows that this is possible. Damage to birds and other wildlife can be minimised by a strong or proactive approach – guiding turbines to the right sites. Good planning can facilitate development appropriate for the long term”

Backup

The Department of Energy and Climate Change feels that security of supply comes from a having mix of technologies. Having a mix means that if there is a problem in one part of the system, we have a better chance of keeping the lights on, and doing so affordably. This mix will include cleaner fossil fuels as well as nuclear and renewables.

Wind farms offer a flexible, modular system that if implemented as a diversified resource with effective geographic spread can offer a reliable source of low-carbon energy, forming a core part of a mixed renewables portfolio

in combination with a reduced platform of responsive conventional capacity.

The increasing installed capacity of wind power across the UK poses a considerable technical challenge to ensure the balance of demand and supply is maintained at all times across the grid. However, while availability of wind is to some extent uncertain for any one area, coping with large swings in supply and demand is a problem transmission operators have been familiar with for some time. And while the requirement on existing plant to provide some extra

reserve capacity causes some concern, it is clear that national installed wind capacity can form an aggregated ‘balancing region’ whereby its perceived unreliability due to site-specific variability has been overestimated.

Viability of onshore wind

Onshore wind is the most cost effective of all renewable energy sources to date. At the moment generating electricity from renewable technologies is more costly than generating it from fossil fuels. If we are to meet our target of producing 15% of our energy from renewables by 2020 then appropriate support must be provided now to these technologies to ensure that they become viable and cost effective in the longer term. The Department of Energy and Climate Change says on economics of onshore wind: “We recognise that the costs of renewable technologies must come down – and they are. The gap between onshore wind costs and combined cycle gas turbine costs has halved in the last five years. We are therefore proposing a reduction in the level of support to onshore wind to reflect that their renewable technologies must become cost competitive with other low carbon sources in the longer term. Recent energy bill increases have been driven by rising wholesale energy costs, mainly the price of imported natural gas, which makes up around half of household energy bills. Figures published Ofgem, the electricity regulator, shows that the impact of the Renewable Obligation for large scale onshore wind in 2011 was £6.00 per household.”